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Overall quality of life is better in Canada for majority of new Canadians

By Workplace Staff
| www.cos-mag.com

A new Ipsos Reid poll conducted on the newly launched Multicultural Connection Panel finds that ethnic and new Canadians view overall quality of life as better in Canada compared to their home country. Nearly nine-in-ten ethnic and new Canadians feel overall quality of life in Canada is better than their home country (86 per cent with 44 per cent much better in Canada and 42 per cent somewhat better in Canada). One-in-ten believe quality of life is about the same between the two countries (9 per cent) and only 5 per cent believe the opposite is true – quality of life is somewhat better in their home country.

Despite a better overall quality of life, ethnic and new Canadians view their social life and job opportunities less favourably. Specifically, the poll finds that four-in-ten ethnic and new Canadians consider their social life to be better in their home country than in Canada (42 per cent with 15 per cent much better in home country and 27 per cent somewhat better in home country). This is compared to three-in-ten who have a better social life in Canada (28 per cent with 13 per cent much better in Canada and 15 per cent somewhat better in Canada). A significant minority view their social life to be the same in both countries (30 per cent).

Views are split for job opportunities. Slightly more than one-third think job opportunities are better in Canada (39 per cent with 18 per cent much better in Canada and 21 per cent somewhat better in Canada), while an similar percentage believe there are better job opportunities in their home country (36 per cent with 9 per cent much better in home country and 27 per cent somewhat better in home country). One-quarter feel there is no difference between Canada and their home country when it comes to job opportunities (25 per cent).

“Immigrants come to Canada seeking a better life for their family and children. Though quality of life (i.e., air, environment) is perceived to be better in Canada compared to their home country, there is still disappointment with job opportunities. Recent immigrants to Canada are well-educated with professional degrees, and have extensive skills and work experience. More companies need to create or participate in programs to hire these new Canadians who are able to make an immediate contribution to the Canadian economy. They are our solution to Canada’s rapidly aging workforce, which we risk losing to reverse immigration back to their home countries,” says Jill Hong, vice-president at Ipsos Reid in Toronto.

These views are similar across various demographic subgroups: gender, household income, and province (British Columbia vs. Ontario). However, a few differences between population subgroups exist. In particular, South Asians are more likely than Chinese to view aspects of life in Canada positively compared to their home country:

  • South Asians are more likely than Chinese to feel overall quality of life is much better in Canada than their home country (62 per cent vs. 37 per cent);
  • South Asians are more likely than Chinese to view their social life as better in Canada than their home country (48 per cent vs. 21 per cent); and,
  • South Asians are more likely than Chinese to consider job opportunities to be better in Canada than in their home country (71 per cent vs. 27 per cent).

As well, those who have lived in Canada less than 10 years are more likely to view their social life as better in their home country than in Canada (56 per cent vs. 35 per cent of those who have lived in Canada for more than 10 years).

The Multicultural Connection Panel allows ethnic and new Canadian respondents to conduct online surveys in multiple languages including Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Punjabi, Hindi and English. This panel is housed in Ipsos Reid’s Interactive Forum (IAF) software which is a custom panel platform. The panel offers marketers the opportunity to reach Canada’s growing segment of ethnic and new Canadians at a fraction of the cost of traditional research with this population.

Detailed tables can be viewed at www.ipsos-na.com/.

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