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Number of workers injured by motor vehicles peaks during fall, winter months: WorkSafeBC

| www.cos-mag.com

WorkSafeBC data show that the number of workers who experienced a lost-time injury after being struck on the road or roadside is highest during the wetter, darker fall and winter months. As a result, the agency is reminding drivers to be extra vigilant and slow down.

Fifteen British Columbia workers were killed and another 280 missed time from work from 2006-15 as a result of being struck by a motor vehicle on a public road in the course of their work. Of those workers, 146 were injured during the fall and winter months, versus 134 during the spring and summer.

“Workers who must perform their duties near traffic face the risk of being struck year-round, but especially when drivers may find it more difficult to see them,” said Mark Ordeman, WorkSafeBC industry and labour services manager. “We ask all drivers to keep that in mind and slow down — especially as weather conditions can change quickly and deteriorate — so that all workers can return home safe each night.”

Many different types of workers perform their duties in proximity to traffic, including:

•construction workers

•transit operators

•transport truck drivers

•delivery and courier service drivers

•letter carriers

•telecommunications installation and repair workers

•firefighters

•public works maintenance equipment operators.

WorkSafeBC offers information on its website for workers performing duties in and around traffic. This includes links to a Road Safety at Work tool kit with tools and resources for employers, supervisors and workers to help keep workers safe when working in and around traffic.

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