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Construction tops Alberta’s workplace fatality list

By COS staff
| www.cos-mag.com

Alberta’s construction industry has the highest number of workplace fatality over the last 10 years, according to latest statistics from the province’s Ministry of Employment and Immigration.Alberta’s construction industry has the highest number of workplace fatality over the last 10 years, according to

latest statistics

from the province’s Ministry of Employment and Immigration. 

Between 1998 and 2007, 406 workplace deaths occurred in Alberta’s construction and construction trade sector. Transportation, communication and utilities came in second with 216 fatalities, while the agriculture and forestry industry had the lowest number with 26 fatalities over the last 10 years.

The latest provincial safety statistics also indicates a

drop in the number of lost-time injuries

and a rise in workplace fatality between 2006 and 2007.

The provincial lost-time claim rate for 2007 was 2.12 per 100 person years, a drop from 2.35 in 2006. Lost-time claim rate in Alberta has consistently dropped over the last seven years, according to the province’s Ministry of Employment and Immigration.

Meanwhile, there were 154 workplace deaths that occurred in the province last year, an increase from 124 in 2006. Despite this rise, fatality rate in Alberta has remained “relatively consistent” over the last ten years, according to Barrie Harrison from the ministry’s communications department.

A ministry statement indicates that while the fatality rate for 2007 is 19 per cent higher than 2006, it is consistent with rates over the past 10 years. The average number of fatalities over the last decade is 92 per million person years.

“On one hand, we’re making great gains when it comes to reducing workplace injuries,” Alberta Employment and Immigration Minister Hector Goudreau says in a statement. “On the other hand, there are still far too many workers in Alberta getting killed on the job.”

The minister says government needs to step up collaborative efforts with industry, labour, safety associations and workers.

Of the 154 fatalities in 2007, 63 were due to occupational diseases, 44 were related with motor vehicle incidents, and 47 were workplace incidents.

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