Hygiene Stories (77)

The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration has issued a memo to provide guidance around new combustible dust classification.
The Newfoundland and Labrador government must take immediate action to ensure fair compensation for the health problems suffered by former asbestos miners and their families, a new advocacy group says.
Manufacturing workers in Canada and the United States who use laundered shop towels may be exposed to lead and other metals, found a recent study.
The Government of Saskatchewan has proclaimed The Public Health (Howard’s Law) Amendment Act which makes the web-based Saskatchewan Asbestos Registry mandatory for crown corporations, school districts, health regions and facilities and provincial government buildings.
The United States Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has launched two new web resources to assist companies with keeping their workers safe from exposure to the thousands of hazardous chemicals that are used in workplaces every day.

Producing safe food safely

Written by Linda Johnson Tuesday, 01 October 2013 00:00
As consumers, many of us tend to take for granted the foods we find in our local grocery store. But for the companies that produce those foods, worker safety can never be taken for granted. From physical injuries to mental health concerns, processing plants can present a wide range of hazards.
The sum total of adverse working conditions explains a substantial portion of the risk of depression in working-age adults, suggests a recent study out of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM). 
Workers who have been on the job for less than two months are at a greater risk of heat strokes, sun strokes and other health-related illnesses, according to a study by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH).

When hazards come calling

Written by Linda Johnson Thursday, 04 July 2013 16:20
An occupation that requires workers to spend much of the day making and receiving telephone calls may sound like a relatively safe job. But call centre work has many serious health risks.
When Dimitrio Guzzardi attended a rock concert with his spouse recently, they had great seats eight rows from the stage. They also had a good view of the person in charge of measuring sound levels. Guzzardi, an industrial hygienist, read the meter over the man’s shoulder.
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next > End >>
Page 2 of 6

COS1296-2014 Oil-and-Gas-web-ad Final
@CanBorder officers at small crossings exposed to radon gas, pests http://t.co/3L3zIHtG1N
Who is a supervisor? Ontario Ministry of Labour releases guideline http://t.co/ByGjIgONPB @safety_law
It's time to upgrade your JHSC to the "next generation." Find out how at tomorrow's webinar: http://t.co/vrk7BkthHD
Nova Scotia seeing improvements in workplace safety http://t.co/RlQA9RGbQZ #SSNS2015 @SafetyNS
Too much tablet use can lead to neck injury: Study http://t.co/WgKj34WFL9 #ergonomics